Monday, March 20, 2017

Red Samurai and Oracle PaaS JCS Success - JET/ADF BC REST Cloud Production Application

I would like to share our success in Oracle PaaS service - Java Cloud (JCS). We have managed to implement JET/ADF BC REST system in short period of time and deploy it in production running on Oracle JCS. UI is implemented entirely with JET, while back-end REST services are running on top of ADF BC. Secure access is controlled by unique ID managed by server side ADF Security.

Production application implements custom invoice processing logic for startup candy factory/distributor in Lithuania. Oracle Cloud doesn't require administration and provides all mandatory services to run custom application. This is primary reason why decision was made to use Oracle Cloud. In the next phase we are going to implement warehouse management logic, tightly integrated with invoice processing.

JET UI

Home screen displays dashboard with financial data for orders, customers and invoice items:


Menu structure (JET Router) is focused around implemented business logic:

1. Dashboard - statistical data display
2. New Invoice - invoice creation module
3. Template Setup - invoice template setup, to speed up invoice creation
4. Invoice Search - search through all invoices
5. Customer Setup - customer data management
6. Supplier Setup - supplier data management

Invoice Search screen implements form block and results table with pagination. This screen is using a set of JET components, starting from input list to responsive UI:


User have option to select invoice for editing. Various invoice fields can be changed in this screen. UI remains responsive and can be rendered on mobile device or JET Hybrid application - this was one of the key requirements:


Invoice items are edited in JET dialog. This is very convenient approach, JET dialog works really fast and allows to switch from one item to another in a quick way:


Development process - Oracle Developer Cloud Service

Application was developed using Oracle Developer Cloud Service. We think Agile boards/sprints defined in DevCS are really helpful. Offered functionality simplifies task management/monitoring process and you can see the progress in the sprint:


DevCS provides Git source control repository, agile board and issue tracking. It also gives you Build Automation. We were using Build Automation to re-build changes committed in ADF BC REST repository:


After build process completes - there is a an option to redeploy latest EAR package directly to JCS. This helps to save time, no need to repeat redeployment routine steps yourself each time when new build completes:


Application Structure

Application is divided into two parts (two separate deployments): ADF BC REST and JET UI implementation.

ADF BC REST implements back-end REST services and provides authentication/authorisation control. We are using regular ADF BC development, together with REST interface provided out of the box starting from ADF 12.2.1:


JET UI application is following modular architecture approach. Each use case is implemented in separate module. Common logic (REST service definition, etc.) is moved out into controller modules. Client side business logic is implemented in JET module JavaScript functions and rendered with JET UI components:


Oracle Cloud Deployment

We are using Oracle Java Cloud Service instance to run both ADF BC REST app and JET. ADF can't be deployed to Oracle Application Container Cloud service, but you can host JET from Java Cloud. For this reason it was more sense for us to use only Java Cloud and run both server side and host client side from the same instance.

Both demo and prod environments run from the same Cloud instance, targeted to different Managed Servers (to simplify maintenance):


If we take a look into application runtime statistics, ADF BC REST application mainly executes ADF REST servlet (to produce REST request response), our custom PDF servlet and ADF authentication servlet to execute session logout:


JET wrapper application doesn't run any server side logic, it simply return JET application content to the client - only File Servlet is invoked in operation:


Performance

JET runs on client side, there are much less server side calls comparing to ADF Faces application. In this example we change invoice status to Submitted. In result several REST calls are executed, each running below 100 ms. and transferring just a bit of info. Key difference between JET and ADF Faces - REST call doesnt block client functionality. REST call may execute asynchronously and user can continue to work with the application:


In the example below, we navigate to invoice list screen. Invoice MAR-36 status was changed to submitted, invoice line data is re-fetched to display up-to date information in the table for particular row. Invoice row data is re-fetched below 100 ms.:


Let's check navigation in the table. We navigate to the last page. REST request is completed in around 100 ms., and it returns only a set of rows for the last page:


When user log's our from JET application, we execute request for adfAuthentication servlet with parameter logout=true. This allows to close ADF BC REST session on the server side:


Summary

1. JET UI and ADF BC REST server side can be used in production system

2. JET UI and ADF BC REST runs great on Oracle Java Cloud

3. Oracle Developer Cloud Service is useful for JET and ADF development

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